Press Clips: Expansion in the UK; New Brewery in Denver; Beer and Church

In the United States, the craft beer movement (in all names and forms) has been around since late 1970’s. More recently, however, demand for greater complexity and flavors in beer is something that is beginning to catch on elsewhere in the world.

Despite an overall decline in beer consumption in the United Kingdom, “the craft brewing sector has enjoyed compound growth of 12% over the last five years,” reports The Herald Scotland.

The article cites BrewDog as a major player in the growing scene as well as other emerging breweries including Traditional Scottish Ales, Fyne and Broughton Ales. The key for success in Scotland, the article posits, is working together.

“Better collaboration across distribution and sales operations is a key aspect to overcoming the challenges which many within the sector are faced with,” wrote The Herald Scotland.

Back stateside, the craft beer scene continues to flourish and grow. Denver saw the launch of another new brewery this past weekend with the opening of Grist Brewing Co.

According to Matt Prekel, a sales and marketing representative at Grist, the 5,000 square foot brewery will use a new, American-made 20-barrel brewhouse. The facility is also equipped with four 20-barrel fermenters, one 20-barrel brite tank and five 20-barrel serving tanks.

The brewhouse was built by JW Sprinkman of Wisconsin, Prekel said.

Grist will serve its Kolsch, India Pale Ale, Hefeweizen, Brown, Stout and Belgian Ales on tap and on site, with growlers also available for purchase.

Across the country, New Jersey will soon be getting a taste of Israeli craft beer thanks to Dallas, Texas-based Sublime Import’s recent purchase of Malka, one of Israel’s first craft breweries, which located in the Western Galilee region of the country. Malka’s Blonde Ale, Pale Ale and Dry Stout will be distributed in New Jersey per an agreement Sublime has with New Jersey-based distributor Hunterdon Brewing, according to

While craft beer expanding into new states and countries all over the world, it’s also carving out a home for itself in one of the most unlikely places for the beverage: church.

“With mainline religious congregations dwindling across America, a scattering of churches is trying to attract new members by creating a different sort of Christian community,” reported National Public Radio. “They are gathering around craft beer.”

Take for example, Zio Carlo brewpub in Fort Worth, Texas, where people gather every Sunday to worship, eat pizza, throw back a couple pints and take communion. The weekly event even has a catchy name: Church-in-a-Pub.