Center for Alcohol Policy Releases New Video on Origin of America’s State-Based Regulatory System


LAS VEGAS, NV – Center for Alcohol Policy Chairman of the Board of Trustees Brian Clark today addressed attendees of the National Beer Wholesalers Association’s 76th Annual Convention and Trade Show at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada, and introduced a new video explaining the origin of America’s state-based regulatory system.

“The Center for Alcohol Policy is an educational foundation focusing on state based alcohol regulation – the very basis of today’s effective system,” Clark said. “That effective system works to balance alcohol control with an orderly and competitive marketplace. This system also works to provide choice and variety for thirsty consumers while protecting the public and keeping communities safe.”

The new video features Center for Alcohol Policy advisors Brannon Denning, professor at Samford University’s Cumberland School of law, and Jerry Oliver, Sr., former Arizona alcohol regulator and chief of police for Detroit, Richmond and Pasadena.

“The 21st Amendment was important because not only did it repeal Prohibition but it also returned control over alcohol policy where it belongs, to state and local governments who can determine what kinds of policies serve the needs of their citizens best,” Denning said.

The video highlights the Center’s republication of the book Toward Liquor Control, which outlined how states could safely sell and serve alcohol following the repeal of Prohibition, and how the book is still helping shape policy today.

“It gives the tenets for why alcohol should be controlled at the local level, why states and local jurisdiction are to have the final say as to how alcohol is accessed and how it’s distributed,” said Oliver.

“It’s clear that what’s acceptable in Nevada isn’t necessarily acceptable in Utah,” added Denning. “The 21stAmendment and the flexibility of state-based regulation allows those local differences to be taken into account.”

To learn more about the Center for Alcohol Policy and its programs – including the upcoming Sixth Annual Alcohol Law Symposium taking place October 23 – 25 in Washington, D.C. – visitwww.centerforalcholpolicy.org.

The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visitwww.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

  • Crowtalk

    “It’s clear that what’s acceptable in Nevada isn’t necessarily acceptable in Utah,” added Denning.

    It’s not at all clear to me. The prohibition against selling beer in New York liquor stores, the minimum bottle price in Connecticut, the stunning politics of Pennsylvania’s liquor control authority have nothing to do with serving the needs of citizens. It’s about back scratching, and don’t try to kid us.